• Using Quay as your Container Registry in Travis

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    In some cases, I prefer using Quay.io as my container registry instead of Dockerhub. If this is the case for you and want to learn how to switch between the two keep reading, Quay and Docker both have their upsides and downsides depending on what type of project you’re doing. In this post, I’m going to show you how to implement Travis into your Quay build, and of course this means you’ll know how to switch between container registries.

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  • ORG Shutdown

    If you’ve kept up with our announcements, or if you recently accessed the travis-ci.org UI, you are likely aware of the planned migration from the travis-ci.org domain to travis-ci.com. This is the final step of a process that started in 2018 to unify Travis CI under a single domain.

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  • Availability of larger VM instances for your builds

    Some builds or tests do require a significant amount of computing power and or RAM. A lot of time can be spared if more of both would be available.

    So, starting now on https://travis-ci.com, it is.

    vm:
      size: [large|x-large|2x-large]
    

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  • The Cookbook: Dpl

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    Dpl is command line tool for deploying code, html, packages, or build artifacts to various service providers. It is tightly integrated into Travis CI’s deployment integration.

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  • Webinar: ARM DevSummit 2020

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    These are the exact examples I used for the ARM DevSummit, integrating Travis CI in real world solutions with ARM and AWS.

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  • The Cookbook: LaTeX

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    Write LaTeX, Push to GitHub and let Travis CI automatically build using Travis’s build functions and script hooks for your LaTeX project and deploy a PDF automatically to GitHub releases when a git commit is tagged.

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  • Webinar: Integrating Assembla and Travis CI into your workflow

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    In February we hosted the first Travis CI webinar in collaboration with Assembla, to show you how easy it is to import an existing repo from GitHub into Assembla’s version control system (VCS) and get up and running with building your project in Travis CI! If you have any questions or comments about the session, feel free to leave them on the video comments section and we’ll be sure to get back to you!

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  • The Cookbook: Deployment

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    In this cookbook, we are going to show you just how flexible you can make the Travis deployment options using bash scripts, stick around and we will show you a great example.

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  • Switching from OAuth to GitHub App

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    As you may have heard GitHub discontinues GitHub Oauth App’s for integrations in May 2021. We’ve received all your feedback from users signing up on travis-ci.com. We understand the access rights/permissions message that’s issued by GitHub is causing a lot of anxiety from our users even though the GitHub App Install is actually used to access the repo’s.

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  • Travis CI Pipelines: 2 Approaches to Source Control Feature Branching

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    Feature branching is a game-changing aspect of modern software development. Being able to have a developer implement a new feature in a body of code in a safe, independent, isolated manner using Git branching is an overall positive approach to the way companies make software.

    Over the years, two techniques of feature branching have emerged. One is what I call branching from repo. The other is branching from fork. Let’s explore each technique, as well as their benefits and tradeoffs.

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