• The Cookbook: LaTeX

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    Write LaTeX, Push to GitHub and let Travis CI automatically using Travis’s build functions and script hooks for your LaTeX file and deploy a PDF automatically to GitHub releases when the commit is tagged.

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  • Webinar: Integrating Assembla and Travis CI into your workflow

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    In February we hosted the first Travis CI webinar in collaboration with Assembla, to show you how easy it is to import an existing repo from GitHub into Assembla’s version control system (VCS) and get up and running with building your project in Travis CI! If you have any questions or comments about the session, feel free to leave them on the video comments section and we’ll be sure to get back to you!

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  • The Cookbook: Deployment

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    In this cookbook, we are going to show you just how flexible you can make the Travis deployment options using bash scripts, stick around and we will show you a great example.

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  • Switching from OAuth to GitHub App

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    As you may have heard GitHub discontinues GitHub Oauth App’s for integrations in May 2021. We’ve received all your feedback from users signing up on travis-ci.com. We understand the access rights/permissions message that’s issued by GitHub is causing a lot of anxiety from our users even though the GitHub App Install is actually used to access the repo’s.

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  • Travis CI Pipelines: 2 Approaches to Source Control Feature Branching

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    Feature branching is a game-changing aspect of modern software development. Being able to have a developer implement a new feature in a body of code in a safe, independent, isolated manner using Git branching is an overall positive approach to the way companies make software.

    Over the years, two techniques of feature branching have emerged. One is what I call branching from repo. The other is branching from fork. Let’s explore each technique, as well as their benefits and tradeoffs.

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  • The Cookbook: Build Matrix

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    A build matrix in Travis is made up by several multiple jobs that run in parallel. This can be useful in many cases, but the two primary reasons we see people use matricies is for reducing the overall build execution time and running tests against different versions of runtimes or dependencies to get the best version of the build. Let’s learn about Build Matricies in Travis CI.

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  • Configuring Travis CI to Run a Deno Project

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    Nothing lasts forever in the world of ephemeral computing. It’s the nature of the beast. Today, more companies are maximizing their IT budgets by practicing the principles of infrastructure as code (IaC). They’re creating and destroying virtual assets on demand in order to meet the needs of the moment.

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  • The Cookbook: Jekyll

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    GitHub Pages are an amazing way to host Jekyll pages, but in some cases, you might be interested in running your Jekyll page on a different host (like Azure Web Apps, Heroku, AWS). In this Cookbook let’s setup a DevOps Build Pipeline that takes commits, run smoke screen testing, and actually deploying.

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  • The Build, Test, Nuke Pattern

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    Nothing lasts forever in the world of ephemeral computing. It’s the nature of the beast. Today, more companies are maximizing their IT budgets by practicing the principles of infrastructure as code (IaC). They’re creating and destroying virtual assets on demand in order to meet the needs of the moment.

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  • The Cookbook: Fable

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    Fable produces readable JavaScript code compatible with ES2015 standards and popular tooling like Webpack, which you’ve probably heard of if you’ve ever used React. Let’s start this Fable.

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